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TAX 
RESOURCES

We provide a summary of important IRS information with links to serve as a guide to our clients. 

Track Your Refund

You will Need:

  • Social Security number or ITIN

  • Your Filing Status

  • The exact amount of your refund

When to call the IRS?

  • Most refunds are issued in less than 21 days; however there are instances where some require additional time and therefore you should only call under the following circumstances:

  • It's been 21 days or more since you e-filed

  • It's been 6 weeks or more since you paper mailed your return

  • Or, in instances when "Where's My Refund" instructs you to contact the IRS

Important Tax Due Dates

March 2024

  • March 15 | S Corporation income tax return due [Form 1120-S]

  • March 15 | S Corporation income tax return extension due [Form 7004]

  • March 15 | Partnership income tax return due [Form 1065]

  • March 15 | Partnership income tax return extension due [Form 7004]

April 2024

  • April 15 | Individual income tax return due [Form 1040 and 1040NR]

  • April 15 | Individual income tax return extension due [Form 4868]

  • April 15 | Corporation income tax return due [Form 1120]

  • April 15 | Corporation income tax return extension due [Form 1040-ES

September 2024

  • September 16 | S corporation income tax return extended [Form 1120S]

  • September 16 | Partnership income tax return extended due date [Form 1065]

October 2024

  • October 15 |  Individual income tax return extended due date [Form 1040 and 1040NR

  • October 15 |  Corporation income tax return extended due date [Form 1120]

 

2024 Estimated Tax Due Dates

  • 1st quarter payment - April 15, 2024 

  • 2nd quarter payment - June 16, 2024

  • 3rd quarter payment - September 16, 2024

  • 4th quarter payment - December 16, 2024, for C Corporations - or January 14, 2024, for individuals.

2024 Tax Rates

The 2024 Standard Deduction Amounts are as follows:

  • $14,600 Single Taxpayers and Married Filing Separately

  • $29,200 Married Jointly & Surviving Spouses

  • $21,900 Head of Household

The 2024 Individual Taxpayers Tax Rates are as follows:

  • 10% for single individuals up to $11,600; for married individuals filing jointly up to $23,200; for heads of households up to $16,550

  • 12% for single individuals $11,601 to $47,150; for married individuals filing jointly $23,201 to $94,300; for heads of households $16,551 to $63,100

  • 22% for single individuals $47,151 to $100,525; for married individuals filing jointly $94,301 to $201,050; for heads of households $63,101 to $100,500

  • 24% for single individuals $100,526 to $191,950; for married individuals filing jointly $201,051 to $383,900; for heads of households $100,501 to $191,950

  • 32% for single individuals $191,951 to $243,725; for married individuals filing jointly $383,901 to $487,450; for heads of households $191,951 to $243,700 

  • 35% for single individuals $243,726 to $609,350/$365,600; for married individuals filing jointly $487,451 to $731,200; for heads of households $243,701 to $609,350

  • 37% for single individuals $609,351/$365,601 or more; for married individuals filing jointly $731,201 or more; for heads of households $609,351 or more

Social Security Tax Rates

Social Security

  • Social Security Maximum Taxable Earnings $168,600

  • Social Security Tax Rate: Employers 6.2%

  • Social Security Tax Rate: Employees 6.2%​
     

Medicare:

  • Medicare Maximum Taxable Earnings Unlimited

  • Medicare Tax Rate: Employers 1.45%

  • Medicare Tax Rate: Employees 1.45%​

  • Social Security and Medicare Tax Rate: Self-Employed 15.3%

Social Security & Medicare:

  • Social Security and Medicare Tax Rate: Self-Employed 15.3%

Keeping Your Records

The length of time you should keep a document depends on the action, expense, or event which the document records.

 

Below is a guide to help you keep the necessary documentation required by the IRS.

  • Keep records for 3 years if situations (4), (5), and (6) below do not apply to you.

  • Keep records for 3 years from the date you filed your original return or 2 years from the date you paid the tax, whichever is later, if you file a claim for credit or refund after you file your return.

  • Keep records for 7 years if you file a claim for a loss from worthless securities or bad debt deduction.

  • Keep records for 6 years if you do not report income that you should report, and it is more than 25% of the gross income shown on your return.

  • Keep records indefinitely if you do not file a return.

  • Keep records indefinitely if you file a fraudulent return.

  • Keep employment tax records for at least 4 years after the date that the tax becomes due or is paid, whichever is later.

IRS Forms & Publications 

A list of IRS forms and publications have been added here with links for your convenience.

Employment Forms:

  • Form W4 Employee’s Withholding Allowance Certificate - CLICK HERE

  • Form I-9 Employment Eligibility Verification - CLICK HERE

Tax Payer Identification Number Forms:

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